Florida Supreme Court

The Florida Supreme Court will today hear 3 cases. 1) SC19-385 Steven Younkin v. Nathan Blackwelder - Nathan Blackwelder sued Steven Younkin for personal injuries sustained in an automobile accident. Younkin's legal counsel retained a physician to perform a medical examination on Blackwelder. Before the scheduled exam, Blackwelder requested information about the financial relationship between Younkin's legal counsel and the medical expert. The trial court approved the request over Younkin's objections. Younkin filed a petition for writ of certiorari in the Fifth District Court of Appeal, challenging the trial court's ruling. The Fifth DCA denied the petition but certified a question of great public importance to this Court for review. 2) SC19-1118 Brent A. Dodgen v. Kaitlyn P. Grijalva - Kaitlyn Grijalva sued Brent Dodgen for personal injuries sustained in an automobile accident. Dodgen's legal counsel requested that Grijalva undergo medical examinations. Grijalva requested information about the financial relationship between Dodgen's liability insurer and the assigned expert medical examiners. The trial court allowed the discovery over Dodgen's objections. Dodgen filed a petition for writ of certiorari in the Fourth District Court of Appeal, challenging the trial court's ruling. The Fourth DCA denied the petition but certified a question of great public importance to this Court for review. 3) SC19-1947 State of Florida v. Jose Maisonet-Maldonado - In 2010, Maisonet-Maldonado killed his girlfriend and led police on a high-speed chase that resulted in the deaths of two others. He was convicted of first-degree murder, two counts each of vehicular manslaughter, and three counts of fleeing or eluding a law enforcement officer causing death or serious injury. The Fifth District Court of Appeal affirmed his convictions on direct appeal. Maisonet-Maldonado filed a postconviction motion in the trial court, arguing that his convictions violate the Double Jeopardy Clauses of the U.S. and Florida Constitutions. The trial court rejected his claim. On appeal, the Fifth DCA reversed the ruling, concluding that the single homicide rule barred dual convictions for vehicular manslaughter and fleeing or eluding a law enforcement officer causing death or serious injury resulting from a single death, and certified a question of great public importance to this Court for review.